Home > Deaf Blog/Vlog > Fingerspelling E

Fingerspelling E

January 21, 2013

By Jimactor

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Categories: Deaf Blog/Vlog
  1. Jim Lomanto
    January 21, 2013 at 8:17 pm

    To everybody:
    I am very sorry that I deleted the old vlog and add this vlog. I didn’t realize that I deleted the comments. If u want to put the comments. Pls feel free to reinsert ur comments. Thank you

  2. TIGER5059@AOL.COM
    January 21, 2013 at 8:24 pm

    3RD TIME I GOT IT.

  3. January 21, 2013 at 8:33 pm

    No problem! I’ve updated the link to this post on my blog! 🙂 Please check my vlog about fingerspelling “E”. Thanks!

  4. Oh yrs
    January 21, 2013 at 8:56 pm

    I totally agree with you that there are some “lazy” signers! As an Deaf interpreter for the DeafBlind, it is important that my signs are clear and crisp so that my clients understand me – and they appreciate it. Yet when I’m chatting with my Deaf peers, their signs are sloppy! Argh! Is this some type of “slang” that I didnt know? Some type of temporary phrase? Come on…our ASL is beautiful – be proud of it!

  5. Pearl Swan Youth
    January 21, 2013 at 9:05 pm

    I agree with you, Jim Lomanto. It seems that some people who learned ASL, tend to want to do their way of marking their prints on ASL evolution by doing their signing in short cut way that will become another new fad sign. I compare that of those new members of Deafened, HOH or Born Deaf “immigrants” as failed oralists of Audism in our Deaf Community TO that of actual hearing foreign immigrants moving here in America for some centuries. They with their mixed spoken languages with foreign accents and their next but American generations as teens influenced our English in not only speech but also in writings like ‘cuz, don’t, etc. Now we see more of those Deaf “immigrants” from Audism or hearing Communtiy, tend to sign like that… I rolled over mu eyes when my sister signs like that, too. I saw Flavia Fleischer spelled like that during her childhood influenced by her interpreters, too. If you and me attempt to keep that ASL as it was before, it won’t be true language. Language exists if it always evolutes itself thru whomever uses it all the time!!

  6. Anonymous
    January 22, 2013 at 1:37 am

    I noticed myself signing “E”, unlike “C”, but all fingers closed together at the top, apart from thumb. It’s part of nature I use, not thinking of how I should spell like what you said or what others used that looked like “C”. But, umph, how can I post the picture of my hand to reveal. Grinning, so hope that makes sense of how I’ve just explained. So, that’s how I used since I started using ASL during High school years.

  7. Patty Tadak
    January 22, 2013 at 1:38 am

    Yes, Jim is right. I hate it when others fingerspell the “new” E which is not correct. Thank you Jim for pointing that out.

  8. Anonymous
    January 22, 2013 at 1:38 am

    Hi James…

    Know what… I used to spell improper “C” fingerspelling while I was growing up in NJ… During that time I did not know that it was not the right way of spelling “C”… I was finally corrected several years after I graduated from Gallaudet… Imagine that? Maybe many did not know either…

    Helena…

  9. M4ASL
    January 22, 2013 at 1:39 am

    I completely agree with you as we should follow the proper ASL way “E” in small configuration style.
    I believe the improper “E” was influenced by hearing environment whether from Hearing teacher for the deaf, hearing parents or no one has corrected or educated the deaf signers. I hope this is not offensive to others but keep in mind that it is not your fault and you were “taught” by others but you CAN MAKE changes to do it the right way. 🙂

  10. maryirene lewis
    January 22, 2013 at 1:39 am

    yeha i agree with u same withnumbers between teh 6 and the 16 those numbers no one says them proper too what do uthink of the numbers im curious what u say for the teens in numbers and the singles in numbers too thanks

  11. from deaf family too
    January 22, 2013 at 1:40 am

    Yes, I have noticed it too. It’s not just the Letter E but other letters and now young teen sign sloppier than my time. Lazy? maybe? Fact: 90% of deaf from hearing family, deaf school enrollment less, mean many from mainstream – maybe lack of strong examples from older adults (not expose to enough older deaf sign language)? I wonder, you notice E from older deaf or mid age or younger?

  12. January 22, 2013 at 1:43 am

    I agree with you about ‘E’. That’s look like ‘C’. That’s confused. Yes, we should keep ASL the way it is.
    About hand hurting, well that applies to hearing people who don’t sign most of their life.
    My mom had hard time sign, because she didn’t sign until I was born. She learn sign when she about 32 or 33. That would make me 8 months old at that time. 🙂

  13. January 22, 2013 at 1:47 am

    Hello, we restored the comments from the previous one that Jim posted.

    Thanks,
    Fookembug Editors

  14. January 22, 2013 at 7:45 am

    Regarding hands difficult to finger spell, we need a kind of ASL doctor specialized in that area of signing injuries or stiffness to give those with struggle to sign better, some exercises to stretch and strengthen the hand muscles to fingerspell better and to sign better. Hmmm

  15. Kathy
    January 22, 2013 at 11:52 am

    After seeing your vid, I checked on myself. I found that my thumb couldn’t do E due to some artitis (spelling?). Fingers could bend close but not thumb.

  16. Rose
    January 22, 2013 at 12:10 pm

    I think older people use properly ‘E’ while younger people use improper ‘E’. Some of comment mentioned that they might learn from hearing, mainstream, etc. Actually, no matter because I know one deaf guy from deaf family use improper ‘E’. Yeah, I would prefer proper ‘E’. I m glad I use proper ‘E’.

  17. Anonymous
    January 22, 2013 at 12:48 pm

    I’m a Coda. I looked at my hand. I use the proper E. But I noticed when I spell quickly I use what you call the “new” E. I guess we just need to slow down.

  18. February 13, 2013 at 8:11 am

    I think with any language that MOST users will not pay much attention to small details. It seems only those who have perhaps become ASL professionals notice these intricacies.

  19. Sandy
    February 14, 2013 at 12:47 am

    I agree with Jimactor. I do fingerspell E touching the thumb as always. I notice a young deaf actor named Sean Berdy fingerspelling E not touching thumb on the TV – “Switch by Birth”. I really don’t like that way he did. I prefer to fingerspell E with touching the thumb. To me, it is easier to fingerspell E touching the thumb than separating E from the thumb..

  1. January 21, 2013 at 8:32 pm
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